actuallygrimes:

this is incredible on like 50o levels

(via suzythered)

friendlycloud:

scifisweetheart:

princelesscomic:

lostthehat:

shuraiya:

beatonna:

lecinematheque:

Pumzi - dir. Wanuri Kahiu // Kenya

In a dystopian future 35 years after an ecological WWIII  has torn the world apart, East African survivors of the devastation remain locked away in contained communities, but a young woman in possession of a germinating seed struggles against the governing council to bring the plant to Earth’s ruined surface.

The main character is a museum curator in the future and also yes I would like see this now please

THERE IS NOTHING ABOUT THIS I DON’T LIKE

The complete short film is on youtube and it’s really good and the end kind of took my breath away. 

I must see this

Sci fi from Kenya…this looks great.

Support

(via nox-artemis)

lonequixote:

Medicine (detail of Hygieia) ~ Gustav Klimt

lonequixote:

Medicine (detail of Hygieia) ~ Gustav Klimt

(via lonequixote)

designboom:

michael wolf frames abstract views of parisian rooftops
all images © michael wolf

segments of overlapping structural elements layer and unfurl as a compact pallet of hues, blurring much of what is recognizable and spotlighting the atypical. see the full series, here.

(via riseupsir)

saltlakecomiccon:

Art Nouveau Wash by artist Megan Lara. Meet Alan Tudyk at Salt Lake Comic Con 2014! Photo Ops and panel schedule coming soon: http://goo.gl/Rsn3YE

saltlakecomiccon:

Art Nouveau Wash by artist Megan Lara. Meet Alan Tudyk at Salt Lake Comic Con 2014! Photo Ops and panel schedule coming soon: http://goo.gl/Rsn3YE

(Source: facebook.com)

Far fewer articles describe the other constitutional violations taking place on the streets of Missouri, and those violations are every bit as urgent as the infringements on speech and assembly. We’ve seen very little coverage of the use of tear gas and rubber bullets as constitutional violations. But the due process clause bans the police from using excessive force even when they are within their rights to control a crowd or arrest a suspect. And tear gas is in a category all its own. Not only is unleashing it into a crowd an unconstitutional exercise of excessive force, but its use is banned by international law. That’s one of the reasons Amnesty International sent a team of investigators to Ferguson. Similarly, the use of rubber bullets under the circumstances is also unconstitutional. Some kinds of rubber bullets are more unconstitutional than others, because certain types are more likely to injure and maim.

But excessive use of force is only the beginning. Pulling people out of the crowd and arresting them without probable cause (or for being 2 feet off the sidewalk) violates the Fourth and 14th Amendments, particularly when those arrests are disproportionately of black protesters. The general arrest statistics in Ferguson reveal what looks to be a stunning constitutional problem. According to an annual report last year from the Missouri attorney general’s office, Ferguson police were twice as likely to arrest blacks during traffic stops as they were whites. Emerging reports about racial disparities in Ferguson’s criminal justice system and the ways in which the town uses trivial violations by blacks to bankroll the city (and disenfranchise offenders) all represent constitutional questions. Why don’t we characterize them as such? These are not just violations of the law or bad policy. These are violations of our most basic and fundamental civil liberties.

Of course, probably the biggest potential constitutional violation of all—and eyewitness testimony suggests this as a real possibility—is the alleged use of excessive force by the police in shooting an unarmed 18-year-old at least six times. Under the law, each of those bullets must be separately justified, as necessary, even if one believes the officer’s story that Michael Brown rushed him. To be sure, the news media has covered this, but very few of us talk about the shooting as a potential violation of the Constitution. Remember, the Constitution is the foundational bargain between the people and their government, the framework on which our legal order rests. When we fail to talk about the arrests, searches, racial profiling, and government brutality in constitutional terms, we are failing to capture how profoundly the state has betrayed its promises.

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Monday night in Ferguson, 4-6 PM.

(via pilgrim--soul)

siryl:

As children, I think we all looked up at the sky and imagined animals in the clouds.  Artyom Chebokha has translated that concept into a gorgeously ominous painting entitled "Tenkhariis."

siryl:

As children, I think we all looked up at the sky and imagined animals in the clouds.  Artyom Chebokha has translated that concept into a gorgeously ominous painting entitled "Tenkhariis."

(via oxfordcommaforever)

lonequixote:

Summer Evening, Wheatfield with Setting Sun  ~ Vincent van Gogh

lonequixote:

Summer Evening, Wheatfield with Setting Sun  ~ Vincent van Gogh

(via lonequixote)