amandaonwriting:



100 Beautiful and Ugly Words
by Mark Nichol
One of the many fascinating features of our language is how often words with pleasant associations are also quite pleasing on the tongue and even to the eye, and how many words, by contrast, acoustically and visually corroborate their disagreeable nature — look no further than the heading for this post.Enrich the poetry of your prose by applying words that provide precise connotation while also evoking emotional responses
Beautiful Words
Amorphous: indefinite, shapeless
Beguile: deceive
Caprice: impulse
Cascade: steep waterfall
Cashmere: fine, delicate wool
Chrysalis: protective covering
Cinnamon: an aromatic spice; its soft brown color
Coalesce: unite, or fuse
Crepuscular: dim, or twilit
Crystalline: clear, or sparkling
Desultory: half-hearted, meandering
Diaphanous: gauzy
Dulcet: sweet
Ebullient: enthusiastic
Effervescent: bubbly
Elision: omission
Enchanted: charmed
Encompass: surround
Enrapture: delighted
Ephemeral: fleeting
Epiphany: revelation
Epitome: embodiment of the ideal
Ethereal: celestial, unworldly, immaterial
Etiquette: proper conduct
Evanescent: fleeting
Evocative: suggestive
Exuberant: abundant, unrestrained, outsize
Felicity: happiness, pleasantness
Filament: thread, strand
Halcyon: care-free
Idyllic: contentedly pleasing
Incorporeal: without form
Incandescent: glowing, radiant, brilliant, zealous
Ineffable: indescribable, unspeakable
Inexorable: relentless
Insouciance: nonchalance
Iridescent: luster
Languid: slow, listless
Lassitude: fatigue
Lilt: cheerful or buoyant song or movement
Lithe: flexible, graceful
Lullaby: soothing song
Luminescence: dim chemical or organic light
Mellifluous: smooth, sweet
Mist: cloudy moisture, or similar literal or virtual obstacle
Murmur: soothing sound
Myriad: great number
Nebulous: indistinct
Opulent: ostentatious
Penumbra: shade, shroud, fringe
Plethora: abundance
Quiescent: peaceful
Quintessential: most purely representative or typical
Radiant: glowing
Redolent: aromatic, evocative
Resonant: echoing, evocative
Resplendent: shining
Rhapsodic: intensely emotional
Sapphire: rich, deep bluish purple
Scintilla: trace
Serendipitous: chance
Serene: peaceful
Somnolent: drowsy, sleep inducing
Sonorous: loud, impressive, imposing
Spherical: ball-like, globular
Sublime: exalted, transcendent
Succulent: juicy, tasty, rich
Suffuse: flushed, full
Susurration: whispering
Symphony: harmonious assemblage
Talisman: charm, magical device
Tessellated: checkered in pattern
Tranquility: peacefulness
Vestige: trace
Zenith: highest point
Ugly Words
Cacophony: confused noise
Cataclysm: flood, catastrophe, upheaval
Chafe: irritate, abrade
Coarse: common, crude, rough, harsh
Cynical: distrustful, self-interested
Decrepit: worn-out, run-down
Disgust: aversion, distaste
Grimace: expression of disgust or pain
Grotesque: distorted, bizarre
Harangue: rant
Hirsute: hairy
Hoarse: harsh, grating
Leech: parasite,
Maladroit: clumsy
Mediocre: ordinary, of low quality
Obstreperous: noisy, unruly
Rancid: offensive, smelly
Repugnant: distasteful
Repulsive: disgusting
Shriek: sharp, screeching sound
Shrill: high-pitched sound
Shun: avoid, ostracize
Slaughter: butcher, carnage
Unctuous: smug, ingratiating
Visceral: crude, anatomically graphic
Notice how often attractive words present themselves to define other beautiful ones, and note also how many of them are interrelated, and what kind of sensations, impressions, and emotions they have in common. Also, try enunciating beautiful words as if they were ugly, or vice versa. Are their sounds suggestive of their quality, or does their meaning wholly determine their effect on us?
By Mark Nichol
Source for Article 
Source for Image

amandaonwriting:

100 Beautiful and Ugly Words

by Mark Nichol

One of the many fascinating features of our language is how often words with pleasant associations are also quite pleasing on the tongue and even to the eye, and how many words, by contrast, acoustically and visually corroborate their disagreeable nature — look no further than the heading for this post.
Enrich the poetry of your prose by applying words that provide precise connotation while also evoking emotional responses

Beautiful Words

  • Amorphous: indefinite, shapeless
  • Beguile: deceive
  • Caprice: impulse
  • Cascade: steep waterfall
  • Cashmere: fine, delicate wool
  • Chrysalis: protective covering
  • Cinnamon: an aromatic spice; its soft brown color
  • Coalesce: unite, or fuse
  • Crepuscular: dim, or twilit
  • Crystalline: clear, or sparkling
  • Desultory: half-hearted, meandering
  • Diaphanous: gauzy
  • Dulcet: sweet
  • Ebullient: enthusiastic
  • Effervescent: bubbly
  • Elision: omission
  • Enchanted: charmed
  • Encompass: surround
  • Enrapture: delighted
  • Ephemeral: fleeting
  • Epiphany: revelation
  • Epitome: embodiment of the ideal
  • Ethereal: celestial, unworldly, immaterial
  • Etiquette: proper conduct
  • Evanescent: fleeting
  • Evocative: suggestive
  • Exuberant: abundant, unrestrained, outsize
  • Felicity: happiness, pleasantness
  • Filament: thread, strand
  • Halcyon: care-free
  • Idyllic: contentedly pleasing
  • Incorporeal: without form
  • Incandescent: glowing, radiant, brilliant, zealous
  • Ineffable: indescribable, unspeakable
  • Inexorable: relentless
  • Insouciance: nonchalance
  • Iridescent: luster
  • Languid: slow, listless
  • Lassitude: fatigue
  • Lilt: cheerful or buoyant song or movement
  • Lithe: flexible, graceful
  • Lullaby: soothing song
  • Luminescence: dim chemical or organic light
  • Mellifluous: smooth, sweet
  • Mist: cloudy moisture, or similar literal or virtual obstacle
  • Murmur: soothing sound
  • Myriad: great number
  • Nebulous: indistinct
  • Opulent: ostentatious
  • Penumbra: shade, shroud, fringe
  • Plethora: abundance
  • Quiescent: peaceful
  • Quintessential: most purely representative or typical
  • Radiant: glowing
  • Redolent: aromatic, evocative
  • Resonant: echoing, evocative
  • Resplendent: shining
  • Rhapsodic: intensely emotional
  • Sapphire: rich, deep bluish purple
  • Scintilla: trace
  • Serendipitous: chance
  • Serene: peaceful
  • Somnolent: drowsy, sleep inducing
  • Sonorous: loud, impressive, imposing
  • Spherical: ball-like, globular
  • Sublime: exalted, transcendent
  • Succulent: juicy, tasty, rich
  • Suffuse: flushed, full
  • Susurration: whispering
  • Symphony: harmonious assemblage
  • Talisman: charm, magical device
  • Tessellated: checkered in pattern
  • Tranquility: peacefulness
  • Vestige: trace
  • Zenith: highest point

Ugly Words

  • Cacophony: confused noise
  • Cataclysm: flood, catastrophe, upheaval
  • Chafe: irritate, abrade
  • Coarse: common, crude, rough, harsh
  • Cynical: distrustful, self-interested
  • Decrepit: worn-out, run-down
  • Disgust: aversion, distaste
  • Grimace: expression of disgust or pain
  • Grotesque: distorted, bizarre
  • Harangue: rant
  • Hirsute: hairy
  • Hoarse: harsh, grating
  • Leech: parasite,
  • Maladroit: clumsy
  • Mediocre: ordinary, of low quality
  • Obstreperous: noisy, unruly
  • Rancid: offensive, smelly
  • Repugnant: distasteful
  • Repulsive: disgusting
  • Shriek: sharp, screeching sound
  • Shrill: high-pitched sound
  • Shun: avoid, ostracize
  • Slaughter: butcher, carnage
  • Unctuous: smug, ingratiating
  • Visceral: crude, anatomically graphic

Notice how often attractive words present themselves to define other beautiful ones, and note also how many of them are interrelated, and what kind of sensations, impressions, and emotions they have in common. Also, try enunciating beautiful words as if they were ugly, or vice versa. Are their sounds suggestive of their quality, or does their meaning wholly determine their effect on us?

By Mark Nichol

Source for Article 

Source for Image

(via readmore-worryless)

timhallinan:

Acrylic on Paper, 18” x 24”, 2014

timhallinan:

Acrylic on Paper, 18” x 24”, 2014

(via lostinurbanism)

casethejointfirst:

team-joebama:

cleophatrajones:

Did this cat save the town from financial ruin or something?

it’s bill clinton’s cat so probably

aehtela
This is essentially us when we are out taking photos.

casethejointfirst:

team-joebama:

cleophatrajones:

Did this cat save the town from financial ruin or something?

it’s bill clinton’s cat so probably

aehtela
This is essentially us when we are out taking photos.

(Source: isabubbles)

gabifresh:

take no shit 2014

(Source: gatissed, via caitlinasmits)

lunarviolet:

Grille D’entrée du Petit Palais des Beaux-Arts à Paris, by Charles Girault, c. 1900

lunarviolet:

Grille D’entrée du Petit Palais des Beaux-Arts à Paris, by Charles Girault, c. 1900

(Source: lilith-et-adalia, via caitlinasmits)

sobremesa
[soh-breh-meh-sah]

(noun) This is an untranslatable Spanish word used to describe the period spent after a meal; after lunch/dinner conversation, usually after lunch before returning to work in Spain. It is a time used to socialize and fully digest the savory food, which had been shared. For Latin Americans, sobremesa is a beverage or “tea” also, usually after a meal. In portuguese sobremesa is defined as dessert. 

  • literally: sobre, above, mesa, table. 
(via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ellen Mueller

Burning Ice

The earth has been shaped, both physically and socially, by a striking landscape carved out by glaciers. However, with the acceleration of global climate change, these glaciers are shrinking at a rapid pace, causing environmental and social upheaval. It is the shrinking borders of glaciers — and the forces causing this change — that I am focusing on in this body of work.

This series consists of a graphite renderings of satellite imagery of Icelandic glaciers and mountain-top removal sites in West Virginia. The creation of these works was funded in part by a Puffin Foundation grant, and completed at Nes Artist Residency in Skagaströnd, Iceland, summer 2013.

The drawings are also published in a short book, Burning Iceavailable online.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Cuba Then

Cuba Then (Monacelli Press) features some 260 images from the Ramiro A. Fernández Collection of more than 4000 photographs of Cuba dating back to the late 1800s. It is a sequel to I Was Cuba(Chronicle Books), which in 2007 offered a first selection of similar images from Fernández’s in-depth and often intriguing holdings. A New York-based former photo editor for various Time, Inc. magazines (Entertainment WeeklyPeoplePeople en Español) and current contributing photo editor of Americas Quarterly, Fernández emigrated from his native Cuba to Florida with his mother, sister and 22 pieces of luggage when he was eight years old. That was in 1960, shortly after the triumph of Fidel Castro’s dictatorship-crushing political revolution.

1. Annemarie Heinrich, The Lecuona Cuban Boys on tour in Buenos Aires, Argentina (1940-1941), silver print, 8 x 10 inches. This was a popular Cuban orchestra, which toured the world extensively during the 1930s and 1940s. It was founded and promoted by the Cuban composer Ernesto Lecuona (all photographs courtesy The Monacelli Press unless stated otherwise)

2. Photographer unknown, an unidentified Cuban youth takes part in a voluntary security detail outside the Habana Hilton as curious onlookers edge in for a glimpse of Fidel Castro, who had moved into the hotel for a while (January 1959), silver print, 5 x 7 inches.

3. Photographer unknown – World Wide Photos, unidentified performer in a Cuban-operated circus carrying an anaconda (non-indigenous) snake in Camagüey, Cuba (circa 1942), silver print, 8 x 10 inches.

4. Photographer unknown, the actor Alec Guinness in the Old Havana section of the Cuban capital, seen here in a publicity still from the movie, “Our Man in Havana.” The movie was an of the British author Graham Greene’s 1958 novel. This Columbia Pictures motion picture was the last Hollywood-scale production carried out in Havana before relations between the United States and Cuba were severed (1959), silver print, 8 x 10 inches (courtesy of Columbia Pictures)

5. Photographer unknown, Passengers on a municipal bus (known as a “guagua” in Cuban Spanish), Havana (1954), silver print, 8 x 10 inches

6. Panama Pacific Line, Morro Castle, situated at the entrance to Havana Harbor, viewed from the port side under misty conditions (circa 1925), silver print, 8 x 10 inches

7. Photographer unknown, a rain-soaked crowd during a storm on Havana’s gulf-side avenue and promenade, the Malecón, with a view toward the east (circa 1935), silver print, 8 x 10 inches

Cuba Then (2014) is published by The Monacelli Press.

ausonia:

NASA released a satellite image of India from the evening of the festive holiday of Diwali, the celebration of lights

ausonia:

NASA released a satellite image of India from the evening of the festive holiday of Diwali, the celebration of lights

(via probably-not-martin-freeman)

utterly-insane-panda:

acaipearls:

gdirtydime19:

causethatswhatisaid:

have-go0dvibes:



this-is-para-dise:

My name is Elliott and I like taking long walks on the beach.
This gif is 80 frames. I took a photo every ten steps.



ITS BACK ON MY DASH OMG :’)

This is the best gif I’ve seen in a while.

cool

Second time on my dash for two different blogs!!!!

Sick. As. Fuck.

utterly-insane-panda:

acaipearls:

gdirtydime19:

causethatswhatisaid:

have-go0dvibes:

this-is-para-dise:

My name is Elliott and I like taking long walks on the beach.

This gif is 80 frames. I took a photo every ten steps.

ITS BACK ON MY DASH OMG :’)

This is the best gif I’ve seen in a while.

cool

Second time on my dash for two different blogs!!!!

Sick. As. Fuck.

(via 10000steps)